The Collie as He Should Be

How He Presents Himself

Before we go into any more details, may we say that a Collie tends not to be either a vain dog or a diva, in any way. This is a special breed that interests himself in contributing to (as far as he is concerned) the essential code of making the world a better place through exacting and serious work in order to make a substantial advancement in the well-being of his master. He is a highly developed guy who well understands a certain amount of individual sacrifice for the benefit of all. That said, he still may have quite a sense of humor and retain his very individual personality. He is desperate to please his master or mistress, but please treat him as he should be; a lack of praise for his labor may quite well confuse him and depress him.

Physical Description and Breeding

The collie is a herding breed and normally his colorings are either sable and white or a definite predominance of white on their smooth coats and also often rough coats. White, black and tan melanges are probably the most common. Blue merles also exist in surprising abundance.

Collies grow to around 68” to 74” (average size) with females being about 10” smaller. Weights range from around 50lbs up to 75lbs, with females being considerably lighter than the male.

Collies breed fairly easily but much attention must be paid to any litters that arrive. More human intervention than with other breeds may be required, so do not take on breeding of this breed lightly.

Temperament and Nature

Collies are herders, so bear that in mind when training. They possess an acute brain, allowing them, under correct direction, to manage situations in a way you would be hard pressed to believe. In spite of their inclination towards obedience, as far as herding and tricks are concerned, you will find that they frequently follow their own better formulated plan which may actually put you to shame. These are canny little beauties who will frequently display their superior knowledge of how to deal with animals better than your own ideas, you their embarrassed owner.

Collies almost never have problems with children or family pets. In spite of their love of activity, they are remarkably at home in a calm family environment.

Care, Exercise and Training

Collies can be excitable as a pup and a patient and determined approach to training is often a must. That said, your efforts will be ultimately repaid exponentially. Like many little ‘sparks’ when they are young, Collies mature into the most obedient and fun-loving show-offs as they gain 3 to 4 years of age. That said, most people will find that Collies are extremely easy to train due to their advanced intelligence and, often, a desire bordering on sycophancy to impress and show love for their master or mistress.

When they shed, Collies really do shed. The short-haired variety is obviously much easier, but longer-haired varieties should be combed and brushed almost daily when in their shedding season. This isn’t just for your own domestic convenience but also for the dog itself; he doesn’t overly overheat in hot weather but Collies like comfort. Be fair to him; he will appreciate it. Matting can also be contentious for the long haired type. Briefly, everything may look okay but systematic grooming is essential.

Collies are fine with a medium-sized yard and shouldn’t disturb neighbors. However, they tend to thrive off regular and well-planned exercise regimes.

Conclusion

Collies are a funny mix. Docile and ready to please when they know the time is right, they adore learning new things and will take up each new idea you have with frenetic enthusiasm.

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